core structure of absence (revision)

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riverrun
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core structure of absence (revision)

Post by riverrun » Tue May 14, 2019 1:05 am

I never learned how to stop
I never learned how to start

when I realized I was already in mezzo del cammin
fractionating the mea culpa through the coffee breaks
setting a pace where the sunset is the same invitation,
and love which wasn't even aforementioned become
evident of so invisible within the glow of absent things,
until reach critical mass or a simply oblivion, this pure
religion of men without meaning, this heavenless eden
where we can walk for weeks without magnetic north,
(making unimportant the sincere or fake plastic smiles)
to then ... to then nothing and its daily taxes,
and metaphorical deaths already in sedimentation along
walkways and courtyards, in the coming spring and its
arcsins: this residual doubt in every seasonal blossom.

we have all these names and places, births, time and temples
in perfect tense against this strange urgency that we must be:
to be defined by the embodied actions which gradually fade
in the infinitesimal gestures and upon events without horizon,
all these reverse engineering and wailing walls within verses,
because poetry seems each day more useless,
because it forgot the meaning of raw deaths.

a few attoseconds suffice
or the eccentric worlds of imprecise inches,
(fences, fractions, tithes and decimal systems)
cell pathways and devas, ion signatures and
absorbed mantras, desiderata and suicides,
and a whole collection of dead ends we keep;
in the endless crossroads between yes and no
and its concentric circles to occupy hemispheres,
where people still dream with laws of attraction
through the geometry of sacred polyhedrons
or its failed attempts back-translated in sanskrit,
fused with others pantheons and myths without
bodies, where gods cannot endure our synapses
nor the pranayama solve the exact instant of a
random trauma or the hiatus of a blank shot in
plain sight be explained by its indivisible wound
while our entire past seems to be practically intact
(if was me I would break these years full of promise).

but who still aspires the eternity thus so concrete
if not this very orphanhood of sleeping beauties?

but I do not dare to wake up, to tell what I saw.
I leave to those yet to come my frail boundaries
and my body full of unknown compartments.

and all this upon the spacetime of an unsolved sigh,
gazing the floor as if the insurmountable distance
mattered between large magellanic clouds and pions,
to in vain pursuit and plea all these skeleton keys.
Last edited by riverrun on Fri May 17, 2019 2:30 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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Perry
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Re: core structure of absence

Post by Perry » Thu May 16, 2019 1:39 am

A very long poem which is hard to understand.
If I don't critique your poem, it is probably because I don't understand it.

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Re: core structure of absence

Post by Macavity » Thu May 16, 2019 6:57 am

There are hooks in this poem that pique an interest: mezzo del cammin/pranayama/magellanic clouds
.

My advice would be to look how David isolated and explored meaning in this poem:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=23904

Will continue thinking about your write.

best

mac

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Re: core structure of absence

Post by riverrun » Thu May 16, 2019 11:23 am

You're right, certain words can not be handled carelessly. They need adequate semantic and rhythmic conditions around them. I liked the post you send to me.

Best

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Re: core structure of absence

Post by Jackie » Thu May 16, 2019 4:12 pm

Hi Riverrun,

I'm not at all sure, but you seem to be lamenting that poetry no longer refers to concrete things (has a core structure) but gets lost in abstract gestures, actions and events with no horizon in sight. Is that completely wrong?

I have a problem with "When I realized I was…" I think this begins a subordinate adverbial clause, but I can't find the main clause. Does it begin with "this pure religion of men…"? If so, I can't find the verb for this main clause. True, poems are not always grammatical, but in long poems we need those patterns to understand the message.

There are a few verbs whose subjects follow instead of preceding them. In line 23, it would be more easily understood if you had written "a few attoseconds suffice." And in line 47, I believe you meant "as if the insurmountable distance mattered."

It's probably just an eccentricity of mine, but I can understand poets not using capital letters only if they boycott punctuation as well. If you're going to use punctuation, why not use capital letters so we can see where the sentences begin? As I say, probably just my own pet-peeve.

I enjoyed reading through this,
Jackie

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Re: core structure of absence

Post by riverrun » Fri May 17, 2019 1:01 pm

Thank you Jackie. You are absolutely right. I liked your specific and technical advice. I follow the literary criticism spectrum of I.A. Richards. His book "Practical Criticism" is basically the foundation of what you summed up in your commentary. Sometimes logic eludes in the poetic process, its craftsmanship. Nights are too much full of ether, then we need grammatical and orthographic cohesion to test the poetic qualities of a poem, to not be lost in vague wanderings. Gaston Bachelard said this many times, because we usually write poetry at night. Then when we generally woke up next morning to discard everything we wrote. Poets never should forget this tension.

Regarding "When I realize" it has deep connection with "nel mezzo del cammin" of Dante's Commedia. When Dante wrote his Commedia he realized to late his journey it wasn't only about Beatrice. His "thauma" was to note what he thought would be less vast than in fact was. Beatrice in his poem start as a woman and ended up in "Paradiso" as cosmological constant, a law. Here is where I placed "When I realized", because is too late for me the path of Dante. I know that I won't be able to achive such poetic transformation.

Punctuation in poetry would become a relatively recent habit if we compare all poetic tradition (even more if we go to the eastern canon) -- in Latin and Greek -- the cradle of western epics (where poetry is necessarily sung, or based on an oral tradition), there is no need for punctuation -- so it was with bards and minstrels in middle ages... were not poems to be read, because obviously few could read -- only with gutenberg press that formal rules of writing needed to be established, hence the development of grammar and ortography studies without question the merit. The original epic transcripts had no punctuation, what we find today on the internet are translations to the West through experts as we see in the perseus project (http://www.perseus.tufts.edu), but just see here to better understand: http: //www.openculture.com/2018/07/archaeologi ... ablet.html

To me punctation is about breath, or better saying, pauses... some imagetic needs specificity, so the punctuation helps in that way but I do like what e.e. cummings did. He voluntarily wrote almost all his poems in lower case to confuse the reader, to not strict follow established ortographic (logic) rules. Joyce in Finnegan's Wake did the same among many other modernist writers and poets.

Thank for your comment. I'll make the revision

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by Macavity » Sat May 18, 2019 12:28 pm

You certainly have a range of knowledge...
Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita. Those words comprise the first line of Dante's Inferno, and mean (in Allen Mandelbaum's translation) "When I had journeyed half of our life's way".
Fractionation is a separation process in which a certain quantity of a mixture (gas, solid, liquid, enzymes, suspension, or isotope) is divided during a phase transition, into a number of smaller quantities (fractions) in which the composition varies according to a gradient.
This is a Latin phrase that simply means "through my fault." So when you make a mea culpa, you're acknowledging that you did something wrong and apologizing for it. This term sounds fancy and official, but it's also a bit of an old-fashioned concept. In a world where people tend to avoid responsibility for their mistakes, it's refreshing to hear someone offer a mea culpa.
arcsins: https://www.mathopenref.com/arcsin.html

attosecond: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attosecond
Deva is a Sanskit word meaning “deity.” It refers to a celestial being in Hinduism or to a powerful non-human being in Buddhism. Although the word is generally translated to “god,” the Buddhist deva is not the same as the Western concept of a god. For example, a Buddhist deva is not immortal, nor a creator.

Devata is a plural form of deva, but can also mean a type of smaller deva. In Hinduism, a devata may be defined as a deity, divine being or a good spirit.

Devas can help a yoga practitioner guide their practice and awaken their inner Divine.
unique ion signature(s) (a combination of ions generated by a peptide that maps exclusively to one peptide in the proteome being analyzed)
Pranayama is the conscious awareness of breath: the life force that both energizes and relaxes the body. The term is derived from the Sanskrit, prana, meaning "life force," and ayama, meaning "extension."

Pranayama is an integral part of yoga. The controlled breathing enables both the rhythm of performing yoga poses and relaxing the mind for meditation.
magellanic clouds: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magellanic_Clouds

pions: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pion

I shall return to the poem! :D

cheers

mac

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by riverrun » Sat May 18, 2019 11:41 pm

I must confess some of those terms did catch my attention on many TED talks. Of course most of the time these terms are supported by versed speakers but it always seemed to me a bit cheesy (too convenient speak about new age, zeitgeist, etc), these wisdom pills inside pocket shows. As a reader and a individual who often writes I always get a little suspicious when only one person talks and there is no room for debate, none opposition. It's very common on popular science certain words, specific expressions that makes people "wonder". Sometimes they are indeed expressions that make people wonder, but sometimes is just a way to sell best-sellers. So I can go to a TED talk as a psychiatrist and talk about all pathological cause and effects of depression, about clinical pharmacology and therapeutics -- even add alternative medicine to talk about people who suffer from depression. I still wouldn't know anything at all about Franck, 45 years old, unemployed who lives with his mother in Amsterdam and thought about suicide hundred times. Okay I'm just feigning but there are right now people with such pattern because the world offers such context. Plot if we prefer. What bothers me is not not the TED Talk itself, more the mindset behind... People talk nowadays about everything with such ease, often supported by smartphones. Friend of mine other day at a bar talked about starving somali and throwed up some statistic report from WHO and everyone at table obviously said "oh my god" and such. Then we drank more, laugh about other stuff and went home. Those 10.000 somali wouldn't bother any of us the rest of the week. People now usually mistake to talk about something as the same to know something. To me the poet that showed us this abyss was Dante.

Ty Mac

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by Macavity » Sun May 19, 2019 11:25 am

Hi riverrun,
After several reads, I find this an interesting poem, probably because of the paradoxs and dichotomies. The title promises as much with structure/absence and that opening of stop/start/half-way. The intensity of love through absence is a relatable and familiar theme (though for some/many an experience of hell as well as a heaven on earth :)...doubt/blossom ). The seeking of meaning and framework in spiritual and religious paradigms, in the comfort of poetry, in the science of measurement, dissolve in the raw reality of death. The speaks to me of disillusionment through loss (that immeasurable future promise).

Would unresolved sigh be an edit option to unsolved sigh?

Readers find it helpful for the original poem to be posted as well as the revision: the revision posted first and the original underneath.

hope that helps some

mac

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by riverrun » Mon May 20, 2019 6:57 am

Oh sure I'll try to do next time. I'm not good in editing. I did prefer "unsolved" because it's more ambiguous and elliptical. So as "unsolved" it can be a open, without clousure sigh or a diluted sigh and both meanings satisfy the central idea of the poem, and also match with the other scientific terms about measurement. I didn't want to put "unresolved " because all sighs to me seem without any resolution, they are facial expressions of uncertainty or disbelief which why you probably spoke of. This would be a more straightforward approach. But if we think, unsolved and unresolved are quite close in terms of vocalization. They are almost false friends if speak or read fast. To be honest now, I don't know. I'm just really enjoying all comments here.

Thank you Mac.

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by bjondon » Mon May 20, 2019 3:30 pm

Hi river,
have you had much experience with poetry workshops? This revision seems pretty good (just the last half of Stanza4 I would question) - but I have no idea what you have changed . . . I know myself with longer pieces it is tempting to edit on the hop - if just a few changes you can always detail them in italics below.

TED talks - actually this whole poem would make quite a good performance/film as simulated TED talk : a few random PowerPoint slides, perhaps a completely empty auditorium but with canned audience responses, coughs etc. It has exactly the right flow and slightly breathless quality - You mentioned your interest in poetry's origins as an oral form and these TED talks are perhaps an interesting parallel for our times.

There is an urgency and excitement to this work, yet it is also restrained and I have to say intimidating . . . the reader must work a bit which is no bad thing. Of all the myriad of questions it asks perhaps the most pertinent one here is 'what use can a poet make of a poetry workshop?' I suspect you have already scaled a few heights in your mother tongue and now you are set to do the same but breathing a completely different genera of oxygen . . so we can as fellow poets initially help most with mere technical observations . . . however I note that while you are diving into the English language without entirely knowing how to swim you are doing it with a certain elan and confidence . . . you have comprehended that the very act of drowning has a certain buoyancy, that this 'tension' that Bachelard speaks of between grammatical and orthographic cohesion and the nonconsensual language of the night time's 'ether' has the potential to teach us and even yourself to breathe the water and rather miraculously live.

Jules
Last edited by bjondon on Wed May 29, 2019 12:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by riverrun » Tue May 21, 2019 1:37 am

Hi Bjondon.

I must say first that I'm glad that I met you guys in this forum. The questions and advice are always pertinent. Always. As if everyone really want to peel the skin of poems through many perspectives. This is what interpretation is about (inter + praetium), between values. But to me is simpler. One give his time to understand another simulacra of stanzas and verses is always a kind gesture. As if we are carving for meaning, not because our lives are missing them -- and I think most of the time no -- poetry readers are eager to to collect and nurture meanings, including those they are not familiar with. The text is just a pretext, Bertolt Brecht said this once. My poem is just a pretext to debate ideas as we are doing now.

I'm journalist so in some sense I'm always working with literature. But we all know how journalists are pretentious, they write about everything and presume they know everything. Here in my country this has become a dangerous habit because a large part of the population is illiterate, so the people do not know how to differ the interpretation levels of a text very well. They read comic strips, news, the bible and adds as if they are all the same. Over a literate population with academic foundations this is not a problem because the citizen learned the semantic levels of a specific text, they know exactly what they are reading or "consuming." In countries with little educational development this becomes dangerously implicit. In such a context an universe of subtleties and details are lost. We start to become flat, plain, obvious, even anecdotic. Of course all countries have this anecdotic range but it can become less or more dangerous accordingly to the educational level. It's not only a question of reading, reading books and poems -- but also how you look to you surroundings; people, flora, fauna, etc... that specific time people give themselves to gaze and wonder. If you don't gaze and wonder phenomena and events you can't read because you are not "ready" for perceive meaning -- in fact you despise everything that is not plain and obvious.

Ty again.

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by HonourStedman » Sat May 25, 2019 4:25 pm

I'm sorry, riverrun, and I know I might be missing something valuable here, but I just can't get to grips with this poem. I have to say that I am with Perry on this one, and indeed, the brevity of his critique might hide a deliberate request that you be less expansive and more concise in what you are trying to say. I do understand that your target audience might be prepared to work at unravelling the obscurity in the poem but I personally feel that I should be able to understand and appreciate a poem without academic credentials in all subjects under the sun.

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by bjondon » Wed May 29, 2019 1:20 pm

Hi again river (should we call you Ty?),
my own feeling is that journalists, rappers and stand-up comedians are on the cutting edge of this new age of buzzing rhetorics. And Brazil - part of the rising BRIC nations - I can well see them establishing a back currency overturning the dollar . . . Whether democracy can ever grow in China is the question this whole social planet may turn upon. Stifling Huwaie is a good start! (Distributors of capital rely on trust - ultimately in short supply from tyrannies - we should take every opportunity to demonstrate that) . Late capitalism wants a connected world, so even if people cannot eat, have never been to school, they may well be watching YouTube . . . a babel-fish of extraordinary and irrepressible powers . . . mostly for the good I would say . . . But perhaps I am being naive here, or just speaking in 'journalese' :)

So back to this poem . . .! Am I going out on a limb encouraging this unusual poetic strategy of yours . . . I don't think so . . . and with each repeated reading I like it more. You have posted four poems to the workshop so far ( +spotlless ways of despair ; cumulonimbus ; entrenchment clauses . . . the last a translation direct from the Portuguese . . . are the first drafts of the others written in English?) All of them are long and dense with an apparently difficult or at least ambiguous syntactical surface . The first reaction is to reel a bit, though picking up on multiple gems of phrasing and word/idea combinations. Perhaps the greatest difficulty for me is this constant hovering question of whether each dizzying disjunction is entirely intended or just a plain mistake Mostly I like this. (On repeated readings I would guess about 80% are well controlled and understood) … smooth them out and much of the energy and breathing spaces of the poem would be lost. The feeling is a bit like being grabbed by the wild eyed transient in Coleridge's wedding party - he/she cannot exactly speak the socially expected lingo, but turn to listen - something extraordinary is being said, and somehow all the more so for the liberties being taken with conventional speech.
riverrun wrote:
Tue May 14, 2019 1:05 am
I never learned how to stop . . . Great start - a taking of metrical breath before we plunge in - but also a confession of complicity - The N is trying to anatomise this 'absence', but acknowledges they too are part of it
I never learned how to start

when I realized I was already in mezzo del cammin . . . S2 Not just Dante but Prufrock too (?) In a way this stanza gives us a fairly straightforward starting position of existential angst, written into our beings by the angle (the arcsins - great word) of the sun/earth . . . the very nature of our biology
fractionating the mea culpa through the coffee breaks
setting a pace where the sunset is the same invitation,
and love which wasn't even aforementioned become . . . adding 'afore' to 'mentioned' puts us off balance and in a sort of pointed literary zone . Likewise 'invitation' seems to want 'to something' but that gap gives it an odd expansive quality. tbc
evident of so invisible within the glow of absent things, . . . . would a comma after 'so' help here?… my reading is 'love too has become evidence of this' i.e. the groundhog day of returning sunset, though 'visible' would make more sense, I don't mind the double negative , the sense still comes through and the absence is in a way magnified
until reach critical mass or a simply oblivion, this pure . . . again very disconcerting syntax . . . normal = 'until it reaches critical mass or simply oblivion' … reach on its own like that functions partly as a noun (a stretch or even something to do with a river). Adding 'a' before simply . . . 'a simply oblivion' - it becomes a sort of noun phrase . . . oh, just another 'simply oblivion' - my original paraphrase is fairly pedestrian but by judiciously garbling it it does acquire quite rich new connotations which seem to work
religion of men without meaning, this heavenless eden . . . is it the religion or the men that lack meaning? - well, of course both. 'heavenless eden' captures the promise of consumerism well
where we can walk for weeks without magnetic north,
(making unimportant the sincere or fake plastic smiles) . . . I like this. We are obsessed with the fake and the 'real' but the N is saying our culture is so dysfunctional they are both just gradations of self delusion. And a peculiar extra awkwardness/paradox thrown in with the word 'plastic' i.e. the idea that our choice is between sincere plastic smiles and fake ones
to then ... to then nothing and its daily taxes, . . . great use of cadence and elegantly oblique play with 'death and taxes' cliché
and metaphorical deaths already in sedimentation along
walkways and courtyards, in the coming spring and its
arcsins: this residual doubt in every seasonal blossom.

we have all these names and places, births, time and temples . . . a switch from the 'I'of S2 to 'we'
in perfect tense against this strange urgency that we must be: . . . you'ld expect 'tension', but 'tense' adds this extra sense of the past, and 'perfect' can also refer back to the list - all three connotations coexist
to be defined by the embodied actions which gradually fade
in the infinitesimal gestures and upon events without horizon,
all these reverse engineering and wailing walls within verses, . . . an interesting jump-cut in the argument from general human futility to a specific attack on 'poetry' , though I take poetry here to mean all 'poetic' endeavours /consolations /attempts to frame or retell the world in some sort of meaningful narrative or aesthetic
because poetry seems each day more useless,
because it forgot the meaning of raw deaths. . . . the repeats thread nicely back to the opening couplet

a few attoseconds suffice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . after the preceding stanza of 7/8s ending in two pentameters this trimeter works well (again like the pounding opening), then opens out into a stretch of pentameters drifting into hexameters. The question is begged 'suffice to do what?' … it could connect (6lines down!) to 'to occupy hemispheres' i.e. to build entire paradigms but mathematically does seem too to link to those pions, but I mostly understand it as the time necessary for a life form to exist, even for an entire universe
or the eccentric worlds of imprecise inches, . . . . this and the series of dizzying pairings that follow all somehow vessels for meaning, the worlds we make, the worlds we find waiting for us
(fences, fractions, tithes and decimal systems)
cell pathways and devas, ion signatures and
absorbed mantras, desiderata and suicides, . . . . . . this combination - desiderata (luxuries that are 'deemed' necessities) and suicides (the ultimate heresy against consumerism, an act that deeply scars the existential identity of those left behind) - has been reeling around my head ever since reading . . . it seems to lie at the core of what you are saying . . . and re the above comment, I suppose that the choice to commit suicide is in a way an assertion of a whole cosmology, a terrifyingly real human act of world making
and a whole collection of dead ends we keep;
in the endless crossroads between yes and no
and its concentric circles to occupy hemispheres,
where people still dream with laws of attraction
through the geometry of sacred polyhedrons
or its failed attempts back-translated in sanskrit,
fused with others pantheons and myths without
bodies, where gods cannot endure our synapses
nor the pranayama solve the exact instant of a
random trauma or the hiatus of a blank shot in
plain sight be explained by its indivisible wound
while our entire past seems to be practically intact
(if was me I would break these years full of promise).

but who still aspires the eternity thus so concrete
if not this very orphanhood of sleeping beauties?

but I do not dare to wake up, to tell what I saw.
I leave to those yet to come my frail boundaries
and my body full of unknown compartments.

and all this upon the spacetime of an unsolved sigh,
gazing the floor as if the insurmountable distance
mattered between large magellanic clouds and pions,
to in vain pursuit and plea all these skeleton keys.

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by riverrun » Tue Jun 04, 2019 3:38 am

Sorry my delay to reply Bjondon and HonourStedman. I was invoveld here with family health issues and couldn't answer properly. Bjondon I must say your criticism are the very reason why I joined this forum. Very pleased by your corrections, comments and ideas creating a background to discuss poetry in broader sense. I will read again e reply properly tomorrow.

really thanks

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Re: core structure of absence (revision)

Post by riverrun » Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:33 am

First your questions go well beyond my poem. And that's great. I'm going to add some excerpts of literary critics to better frame to me what you wrote. First of all I want to speak of translation but not exactly of the text, in other words, what it is translation? A french poet and essayst Henri Meschonnic (in. Éthique et politique du traduire, 2007) wrote this:

"The sense of language implies the sense of rhythm, the sense of body-in-language continuum. And the discontinuum of the sign is what allows us to maintain, pedagogically and culturally, the opposition between literature and ordinary language, between original works and translations. And this traditional opposition between creation or original work and translation is made within the classical mind/body paradigm. [...] We should really stop opposing poetic language and ordinary language (two real essences to my mind, which, comically enough, means that they are cultural ghosts), and we should start from the poem to think the whole theory of language: the relationship between language, poem, ethics and politics. By poem I mean the transformation of a form of language by a form of life and the transformation of a form of life by a form of language. Form, in the sense of organizing and inventing historicity, configuring a system of discourse. [...] From the poem’s point of view, that translating is an activity that can no longer be thought within the sign as it is widely being considered. [...] In other words, more than what a text says, it is what a text does that must be translated; more than the meaning, its power, its affect. It is then no longer a language system that must be translated but a system of discourse, not the discontinuum but the continuum. [...] to translate the poem, in the specific sense I propose, is to translate the continuum and the power of discourse, and no longer only what an enunciation says. [...] We must translate an enunciation inseparably from its utterance, we must acknowledge that the notion of meaning is an epistemological obstacle to the thought of language. Therefore translating a serial semantics, which exceeds the traditional objection according to which what has been done in the phonology of one language system can obviously not be redone in the phonology of another language system (what Ezra Pound called melopeia in ABC of Reading). Because it is not a language system that we have to translate, but what a poem does to its language, thus we must invent discourse equivalences in the target language: prosody for prosody, metaphor for metaphor, pun for pun, rhythm for rhythm". (Meschonnic, 2007)

From this imagine now that you are on a bus or train. As customary of who sits at the window we usually gaze the landscape outside. I love buses and trains because of that. When we drive our cars we do not have the freedom to look at things without purpose. Usually we look at the horizon and sometimes at the rail line or at the road. It is impossible to stare at both places at once! Either we look at the horizon and we are taken by its contextual feature, or we are intoxicated by the incessant flow of details that are close to us by the road or rail line. Moreover, it is not only impossible to observe the two events simultaneously, but it is impossible to apprehend them with our sensibility. It is impossible to contemplate and detail at the same time because both are radically different sensitive (emotional) categories. Without much criterion we could add here what Heinsenberg and his Uncertainty Principle says: "The more accurately the position is determined, the more inaccurate the determination of the moment, and vice versa." He also calculated what would be the value of the lack of precision or "uncertainty". But what any of this have to do with poetry?

If I break the poetic images (but not so much) that represent the horizon of the poem, or if I break the syntax (but not so much) and adopt an accelerated (as you well punctuated) stream of sound and rhymes (trying to stay close to the line train or road) I can psychologically create - at least by trial, imagination and delusion - some fusion of instances that are bound to be separated forever. We see this in Hamlet and his monologues. We see this in Faust Part Two. Tolstoi in War and Peace. We also see this in the Quixote of Cervantes, in the Commedia of Dante. These authors reached the universal exactly because they wrote at same deep and broad landscapes with outstanding range of details. As life itself. These author didn't only wrote stories and poems, they created life. In the end the Dante wasn't par to Beatrice in Paradiso. The love he pretended from the start became meaningless. But not the meaninglessness we usually think. It was a powerful meaninglessness. And why we are so afraid of this powerful meaninglessness? To me this is the core structure of abscence.

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