A poem that I read today by Mac

How many poets does it take to change a light bulb?
Macavity
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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sun Oct 18, 2020 5:21 am

I like the ambush in a poem. I'm not keen on polemical poems. This poem takes an observation of a child/father interaction and delivers an extinction message. The title could have been more subtle, the label is the opposite of an ambush, and I may not have read the poem if I hadn't been checking-out the poet. It is called Greenhouse Denial by Mandy Haggith:

http://tclj.toasted-cheese.com/2018/18-4/five-poems-by-mandy-haggith/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Tue Oct 20, 2020 5:37 am

anyone can wear the mask..... but you can take it off
Tired of those ancient myths? Well, there's always pop culture :)

http://www.freezeraypoetry.com/kate-wilson.html

Of course, there is more than one mask theme playing out here.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Wed Oct 21, 2020 4:05 am

the holes in the carpet where love
wiped the dirt off its feet, the closet
door I leave open so that
my clothes don't get scared
These lines are from a poem by Deborah Ketai called Sanitized for Your Protection:

http://www.millerspondpoetry.com/index.php/current-issue/vol23web3

I like a poem with ambition, that rolls the dice on imagery, and though the ending falls flat, the journey is enough.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Thu Oct 22, 2020 2:14 am

Rather like the rhymes in this:

https://poetryarchive.org/poem/eden-rock/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Fri Oct 23, 2020 1:47 am

https://poeticareview.com/janet-harper/

The very personal concluding line is electric. I had to check out the painting.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sun Oct 25, 2020 3:21 am

https://www.dustpoetry.co.uk/post/vendee-eclogue-by-bert-molsom

A poet taking time to stand and stare, while others have their eyes on work.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Mon Nov 02, 2020 4:20 am

Poetry is written to be spoken was in my head when I went to Ledbury poetry festival a few years ago. I listened to Jane Hirshfield, never having read any of her poems, and didn't have a clue about what she was trying to convey.

This is a poem called A Chair in Snow and comes with a recording:

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/56174/a-chair-in-snow

In the intimacy of that recorded voice I'm listening, hooked, and pondering.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Tue Nov 03, 2020 3:33 am

Remember By Christina Rossetti

Remember me when I am gone away,
Gone far away into the silent land;
When you can no more hold me by the hand,
Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay.
Remember me when no more day by day
You tell me of our future that you plann'd:
Only remember me; you understand
It will be late to counsel then or pray.
Yet if you should forget me for a while
And afterwards remember, do not grieve:
For if the darkness and corruption leave
A vestige of the thoughts that once I had,
Better by far you should forget and smile
Than that you should remember and be sad.
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45000/remember-56d224509b7ae

To indent or not to indent, why is that a question? See the original indentation of this poem on the link.

Sometimes pg'ers suggest spacing into stanzas makes a dense read easier to digest, but what does indentation achieve? Makes the poem look like a poem?

I've indented, an intuition on occasion, perhaps to escape that left side tyranny :D

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Thu Nov 05, 2020 3:32 am

The crowd murmured, and asked
one another what could nothing
possibly mean.
These lines are from a poem called Pickpocket by Tim Vivian:

https://rabidoak.com/locally-sourced/pickpocket/

Like that old TV series...Tales of the Unexpected...with some referencing to Milton too.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Fri Nov 06, 2020 4:13 am

Today's choice is a list poem. A list poem can be overloaded with adjectives, lack the dynamic of verbs, and become lifeless in forensic description (no matter how quirky the detail).

This is a poem by Paul Stephenson called On Pelmets.

https://atriumpoetry.com/2020/11/03/on-pelmets-paul-stephenson/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sat Nov 07, 2020 6:40 am

Empathy is the ability to sense other people's emotions, coupled with the ability to imagine what someone else might be thinking or feeling. ... “Cognitive empathy,” sometimes called “perspective taking,” refers to our ability to identify and understand other people's emotions.
Sounds positive, but that approach opens a door to many a dark poem.

Folktales often reflect dark realities.

This is a poem by Kim Moore called No.21:

https://wildcourt.co.uk/new-work/3091/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Thu Nov 12, 2020 4:49 am

Night will break like a thousand year egg,
its yoke weighing heavy on his creaking frame.
I've often been advised to edit a simile to a metaphor. More immediacy, less distance, being some of the reasoning.

This poem by Stella Wulf uses both...

http://www.inksweatandtears.co.uk/pages/?p=23085

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sat Nov 14, 2020 5:51 am

It can be a bad habit using obscure words, making a poem even more opaque, but then it keeps those words 'alive'.

No obscure diction in this poem, but I like the use of gift/instinct in this context.

The poem is called Sunglasses by Anthony Costello:

https://threedropspoetry.co.uk/2015/02/04/sunglasses-by-anthony-costello/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Tue Nov 17, 2020 6:30 am

This is wrong, this is right. Assertion is endemic to a style of critique, often reflecting a mind blinkered and locked in a personal aesthetic or worse, an 'educated' one. Does this limit an understanding of a poem...I feel it does :)

This poem is a reminder of what is lost...

https://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2020/nov/09/poem-of-the-week-on-a-pebbly-beach-by-john-birtwhistle

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Wed Nov 18, 2020 5:44 am

A feature of watercolour painting is the 'happy accident'. It's the use of water.

This poem by Sarah Cave called out on the water reminded me of that:

http://stridemagazine.blogspot.com/2020/11/out-on-water.html?view=timeslide

On another issue:

There is some sort of correlation, it seems to me, between UK mainstream poetry and its presentation of longwinded narratives with an epiphanic ending, what I have previously classed as ‘smartarse’ poetry in the UK (in a KFS anthology of the same title which I edited), and the US hybrid of narrative and experimental poetry evidenced at its best by the poems of Dean Young and Josh Bell.

Whilst the first of these relies on a reader’s emotional empathy, ego and experiences of a similar nature, the other two are more interested in the possibilities of language and storytelling.

http://stridemagazine.blogspot.com/?view=magazine
The comment needs expanding, but I do recognise the narrative/epiphanic (probably because I have been reading The Dubliners). Personally, I like that style of writing.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Thu Nov 19, 2020 3:15 am

Who hasn’t thought of throwing
the first stone when no-one’s around?
This is from a poem by Ed Meek called Sympathy for the Vandals:

https://acrossthemargin.com/three-poems-by-ed-meek/

Of course, there are always consequences to behaviours, which seems the prompt to these poems...the moral of the story is...

I wonder why his first poem uses capitalised lines.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Fri Nov 20, 2020 6:25 am

Metaphors are often challenging, but understood ones, are like waking up in a morning shower (to use a simile :D they clear the cobwebs - when not a cliche :roll: )

This is a poem by Ann Drysdale called Perfect Binding:

https://abegailmorley.wordpress.com/category/ann-drysdale/

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