A poem that I read today by Mac

How many poets does it take to change a light bulb?
Macavity
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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Thu Aug 20, 2020 2:11 am

This is a poem by Kevin McGowan called 'Crossing':

https://clementineunbound.wordpress.com/2020/07/14/1359/

A neat little poem, unassuming, that captures the scene with dry humour. Made me smile:
it’s a night for big questions
if only we could think of some
An echo of Terry Pratchett in the delivery.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Fri Aug 21, 2020 1:45 am

This is a short poem by Maya Stott called In April

http://www.ravennapress.com/alba/issue_34/stott.html

I like how the poem zooms in on concrete details, the specifics giving meaning and value, and sustain light in dark times.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sat Aug 22, 2020 4:56 am

This is a poem by Jean Kreiling called The View from Shore:

https://autumnskypoetrydaily.com/2020/08/17/the-view-from-shore-by-jean-l-kreiling/

The editor there comments:
The alliteration in line one of this sonnet immediately captured my attention, and happily the rest of the poem does not disappoint: sonics, meter, and metaphor draw the reader in before letting go in the last line.
Some readers read the end of a line as if the 'pause' is a full-stop. The syntax, rhythm and enjambment in this poem is a reminder that such a reading technique is flawed.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sun Aug 23, 2020 3:36 am

This is a poem by Katarina Boudreaux called the White Bike on Rampart

https://petrichormag.com/2-katarina-boudreaux/

A skinny poem I read 'down the page'. Felt the sense of transience and frailty in this poem.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Mon Aug 24, 2020 3:10 am

When all else fails write about writing :D

This is a poem by Andrea Potos called For the magazine who loved and published my poem, asked for more and then kept
rejecting them all
:

http://peacockjournal.com/andrea-potos-three-poems-2/

If the title doesn't grab interest, the procreation imagery might!

Having a poem published can be a validation, though such 'success' may reflect, as Eliot said, 'a lack of ambition' (especially if 'acceptance is centred on a particular magazine/editor...becoming a 'house poet' as it were). Should an editor include their own poems in their publication, drawing on the kudos of the published poets, though not having to 'convince' or as Potos says piercing the veils of your editors’ minds. At least, the editor won't have to jump the 'I don't understand what your poem is trying to say' hurdle ie the poem is impenetrable. A poet/editor always assumes that they are making sense :D

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Tue Aug 25, 2020 6:04 am

I've always been interested in empathy rather than the self-absorbed, makes life richer, fresher, more interesting.

This poem is by Robert Beveridge and is called Intellect. What are your expectations with such a title? Read on :) The poem is on page 19.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1CtXNy8BlgHnsbD1eEx7SAxRLx4mJ0jMj/view

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:31 am

Distracted from distraction by distraction
That line from Eliot has always stuck in mind.
you understand the urge to pluck
the exotic, the beautiful—any diversion
from fear, which is in itself a disease.
These lines are from a sonnet by Richard Levine called Sheltered in Place:

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/153609/sheltered-in-place

Why is the sonnet such a popular form? For me, I feel the structure encourages a process of thought and this poem follows the familiar pattern of observation, introspection, and a concluding resolution. Some poets have a liking for patterns or - dare I say it - maths! How many of us can't live with two stanzas of unequal lines? Or as one critter on PG said 'your poem lacks symmetry'. :D

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Thu Aug 27, 2020 2:41 am

And that’s how I discovered
that keyholes always reveal more
than doorways.
The lines above are from a poem by Arundhathi Subramaniam called When Landscape Becomes Woman. Reminds me of the comment - that could be a poem in itself. I wonder if the poem grew from those lines. Either way, the perspective is proven in this childhood defining moment...

https://wildcourt.co.uk/new-work/two-poems-by-arundhathi-subramaniam/

A definition of a good poem is the 'layering'. This poem looks at gender and gender roles, closed and open worlds, but also prompts the reader to consider the poet's life in pursuit of insight.

There is a comfort in reading a poem with surface transparency, not to be intimidated by opacity, but I find it a more rewarding experience to discover a poem with layers of meaning.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Fri Aug 28, 2020 2:57 am

Re-imagining folktales with a contemporary slant is an option when feeling 'uninspired'. The tales seem to embed fundamentals, nuggets, that rekindle a dwindling creative light.

This poem is by Janice D.Soderling and is fab:

https://lightpoetrymagazine.com/janice-d-soderling-summer-15/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sat Aug 29, 2020 3:07 am

My default thinking is that punctuation provides a tool to 'orchestrate' a read. I have the impression that some poets find punctuation 'dirty' and like to keep the poem clean: punctuation seen as a visual, distracting clutter or just another difficulty a poet can do without (despite confusing the reader). The use of line and space can give an alternative option for guiding a read, but how often is that option a lazy escape that transfers the 'work' to the reader? Some poems are a hybrid, such as this poem called Trowel by Mitchell Krockmalnik Grabois:

http://www.inkpantry.com/poetry-drawer-trowel-by-mitchell-krockmalnik-grabois/

A quirky poem, unsettling and menacing in a way; perhaps it is the reasoning voice - that threading of suggestiveness and surreal tangents that disturbs.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sun Aug 30, 2020 5:03 am

Poetry is a way of looking. This poem looks at the familiar territory of photography, but captures the unfamiliar the mesh of accidental cameras. The kind of poem that may affect how you experience the rest of your day.

https://typishly.com/2018/09/10/our-souls-refracted-through-a-mesh/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Mon Aug 31, 2020 3:01 am

Following on the perspective theme, a poem from Russell Jones, a contributor on another forum I once frequented, which has now ceased.

https://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/poem/ant-swap/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Mon Aug 31, 2020 11:39 pm

I stopped purchasing Envoi and Poetry Wales because there were too many translations (not from Welsh either!) I thought this was stifling writing in Wales where there are so few publication opportunities.

However, I am interested in other cultures, despite the issues of how well poetry translates. I certainly read plenty of prose in translation and enjoy 'world' cinema.

This is a poem by Swedish poet Erika Kamlert:

http://www.inksweatandtears.co.uk/pages/?p=22513

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Wed Sep 02, 2020 5:35 am

I do like themed editions of mags because they have the potential to surprise. There are so many ways of 'seeing' and poetry is a great medium for that.

This edition of Allegro had a history theme:

https://www.allegropoetry.org/p/issue-25-september-2020.html

A good poem will prompt a reader to research: I had to find out more about Christina of Denmark
Christina sat for the portrait for three hours wearing mourning dress. Her rooms in Brussels were hung with black velvet, black damask and a black cloth-of-estate. Christina, then only sixteen years old, made no secret of her opposition to marrying the English king, who by this time had a reputation around Europe for his mistreatment of wives. She supposedly said, "If I had two heads, one should be at the King of England's disposal."
A strategy to dull, as the poem perfectly defines, Henry VIII, with pinup tastes.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Thu Sep 03, 2020 5:50 am

People write poems for a multitude of reasons. For me, it is hobby. Another of my hobbies is birdwatching.

This is a poem about, to an extent, why some people birdwatch, why folk can get very 'serious' about a 'hobby':

https://londongrip.co.uk/2020/08/london-grip-new-poetry-autumn-2020/#pacey

The whinchat/smokestack internal rhyme was a neat catch for pasting theme with sonics.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Fri Sep 04, 2020 5:58 am

the wild haired sage is dancing

The line makes more sense to me with that edit.

The line is in this poem by Daniel Richardson in IST:

http://www.inksweatandtears.co.uk/pages/?p=22523

This poem engages with its contrast of grounded details and speculative observations: the world of work, celestial objects, how the mind perceives and lives existence etc (it is one of those poem's that gets thoughts flowing - which can irritate those readers more comfortable with closed rather than open meanings).

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Mon Sep 07, 2020 4:35 pm

This has been written about hundreds of times before...is a familiar comment, usually with your poem is full of cliches.

Alzheimers is a topic that bores me.

This poem by Robert Hirschfield switched on the interest light:

http://www.inksweatandtears.co.uk/pages/?p=22531

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Wed Sep 09, 2020 5:04 am

This is a poem by Jane Greer from Autumn Sky Daily:

https://autumnskypoetrydaily.com/2020/09/08/in-the-pool-at-the-bourbon-orleans-by-jane-greer/

The editor there comments
This sonnet’s extended metaphor is perfectly supported by its clear imagery and excellent closing line.
I don't like the concluding line, even if meant ironically, the tone is intrusive. Opinions will differ, that's poetry, a simple truth, but worth remembering when being offered workshop advice (especially given with the assertive voice :D )

This ezine has a very efficient method for publication:
2. Response time is one week via publication. If your poem doesn’t appear online within one week, consider it rejected.

No formal acceptance or rejection (email, paper airplane, aural hallucination) will be sent. Read Autumn Sky Poetry DAILY for one week from the date of your submission and you will find out if your poem was chosen for publication when it either does or doesn’t appear online.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Thu Sep 10, 2020 7:47 pm

What are their poems like? These poetry editors that is.

This poem is by Helen Ivory, editor of IST, and delivers that winning combination of meaningful fun:

http://poetry.sangamhouse.org/2019/03/the-art-gallery/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Fri Sep 11, 2020 8:25 pm

This is a poem by Michael Bartholomew-Biggs, the editor of London Grip, amusingly called Everyone knows this is not really about dentistry and so what is it really about?

http://www.morphrog.com/2020/01/05/michael-bartholomew-biggs-3/

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sat Sep 12, 2020 4:28 am

The quality of poems in the High Window reminds me of Antiphon. This is a poem by Sven Kretzschmar called FIRE OVER DUN AENGUS :

https://thehighwindowpress.com/category/poetry/#Sven%20Kretzschmar

My initial reaction was a bit too Middle Earth, but the concluding lines took me beyond a superficial read
when the isle seemed authentic –
despite our presence.
Reminded me of the time I took my son to visit Stonehenge. The connection with the stones was such that I ceased to be an 'intrusive' tourist. I like the poet's awareness, intimation of humility in that final line.

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Sun Sep 13, 2020 5:17 am

I do enjoy a gardening poem, probably because I enjoy the labour of gardening, though I have long learnt not to impose on nature. That would be like forcing a poem because one has thought of a title :)

This poem by Susan Tepper is called On a Calm Night

https://thegalwayreview.com/2020/08/29/susan-tepper-on-a-calm-night-by-susan-tepper/

so much for determination :lol:

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Mon Sep 14, 2020 5:59 pm

Repetition is a feature of traditional poetry, but a feature of contemporary poetry is to compress and avoid repetitions.

This poem by Japhy Mitchell threads the narrative by repeating the word fire. It is the key word that links the events in the narrative.

https://dmdujour.wordpress.com/2020/09/14/japhy-mitchell-fire/

The compulsion to do good, the compulsion to do evil, that fire within genetically coded?

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:32 am

with terrible roots which grip to the ground
Sometimes I feel education seeks to rip out those roots, correct the syntax/grammar, measure expression to an educated standard.

This is a poem by Lydia Harris called It was just part of our living

http://theislandreview.com/content/poetry-orkney-lydia-harris-broch

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Re: A poem that I read today by Mac

Post by Macavity » Thu Sep 17, 2020 8:00 am

It was a ritual, like cleaning windows:
remembering the dead.
Nice simile. I sort of like this poem. It has a progression to meaning, and that progression is processed through doing, connections to the past are made concrete in the actions. What nags me, a little, is the fiction, because that is what the narrative feels like to me. Really, it shouldn't devalue the poem, especially since I write fiction all the time.

The poem is by Nicholas McGaughey and is called Tombstones.

https://atriumpoetry.com/2020/09/15/tombstones-nicholas-mcgaughey/

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