1905 and 1929

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1905 and 1929

Postby k-j » Fri Nov 14, 2014 4:07 pm

I've noticed that since I started tracking my reading in 2006, I've read books first published (in original language) in every twentieth century year except these two.

It's possible I have read books from these years, but before I began keeping a record.

Anyone have any recommendations? I suppose the obvious place to start is one of the top ones on this list. Thoughts? There doesn't seem to be a similar page for 1905.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby Ros » Fri Nov 14, 2014 4:13 pm

You've never read an Agatha Christie? They're an institution.
I've enjoyed the Dashiel Hammett books - beginning of a genre.
You're a bit spoilt for choice for 1929 - there's Wodehouse in there, and Grahame Greene.
May not all be as highbrow as your usual choices, though.

1905 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1905_in_literature

Jules Verne, HG Wells, some Sherlock Holmes.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby k-j » Fri Nov 14, 2014 6:54 pm

Ros wrote:You've never read an Agatha Christie? They're an institution.


No, but I will. I have read the odd mystery and enjoyed it. Dorothy L. Sayers. We have loads of Christies floating around, my wife likes them.

I've enjoyed the Dashiel Hammett books - beginning of a genre.


Indeed and I'm suprised it was so early! I thought that stuff only really got going in the 40's... Shows what I know about genre fiction!

You're a bit spoilt for choice for 1929 - there's Wodehouse in there, and Grahame Greene.


Never heard of "The Man Within" though, looks a bit dodgy. However I notice there is a book by Henry Green who I'm a big fan of.

May not all be as highbrow as your usual choices, though.


What are you talking about, Ros. I read "Pride and Prejudice" recently, which I think you'll agree is pretty gosh-darned middlebrow!

1905 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1905_in_literature

Jules Verne, HG Wells, some Sherlock Holmes.


Actually I read "The House of Mirth" when I was a student, but since I wasn't tracking my reading then I'm not sure it counts.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby Nash » Fri Nov 14, 2014 6:54 pm

I've just been having a tour around my bookshelves and, annoyingly, the likely candidates seem to skirt around those years.

The first English translation of Herman Hesse's Steppenwolf was in 1929 (although it was actually written in '27) does that count?
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby k-j » Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:05 pm

Nash wrote:I've just been having a tour around my bookshelves and, annoyingly, the likely candidates seem to skirt around those years.

The first English translation of Herman Hesse's Steppenwolf was in 1929 (although it was actually written in '27) does that count?


Thanks Nash, 1905 especially seems lean. No, Steppenwolf would count for '27. I know you're a fan. I think I tried it when I was about 14 off my Dad's bookshelf which probably put me off. Don't remember anything about it though. Not too mystical is it?

Just noticed "Death of a Hero" by Richard Aldington in the '29 list which I've been meaning to get hold of for a while.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby Antcliff » Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:10 pm

Para Handy/The Vital Spark started in 1905? I did not know it was that old.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby Antcliff » Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:20 pm

I thought John Cooper Powys might be a good bet for a 1929...and he is. Wolf Solent.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby David » Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:59 pm

The Sound and the Fury, surely? Hard going at first, I thought, but finally - yes, really - a masterpiece.

The only 1905 ones I've read - apart from Sherlock - are House of Mirth and Where Angels Fear to Tread (I had a Forster phase), although I feel I ought to read Kipps.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby k-j » Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:41 pm

Antcliff wrote:I thought John Cooper Powys might be a good bet for a 1929...and he is. Wolf Solent.


Fantastic! Another one I've heard great stuff about. Yet really have no idea what to expect.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby k-j » Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:47 pm

David wrote:The Sound and the Fury, surely? Hard going at first, I thought, but finally - yes, really - a masterpiece.

The only 1905 ones I've read - apart from Sherlock - are House of Mirth and Where Angels Fear to Tread (I had a Forster phase), although I feel I ought to read Kipps.


How is Where Angels FTT, any good? I loved Howard's End, not so fond of A Room with a View.

Don't know anything about Kipps. Wells can be very good or awful...

As for Faulkner, it's just a yawning gulf in my reading. I read As I Lay Dying as a student, didn't really like it, though I suspect I would now.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby ray miller » Fri Nov 14, 2014 11:16 pm

I've just finished reading As I Lay Dying. I loved it, but then I like Faulkner's writing. He surprises you in a slow draw kind of way. Light In August is one of my favourite novels. Graham Greene I've grown to like recently too. I used to carry a copy of Steppenwolf around in my back pocket when I was an impressionable teenager. I read it again a couple of years and just thought how vacuous it was.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby Nash » Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:26 pm

ray miller wrote: I used to carry a copy of Steppenwolf around in my back pocket when I was an impressionable teenager. I read it again a couple of years and just thought how vacuous it was.


You surprise me, Ray! I would have thought a novel about a middle aged curmudgeon would have been right up your alley.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby David » Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:32 pm

k-j wrote:How is Where Angels FTT, any good?

A bit light, so far as I can remember, but that might just be my memory misfiring. It's Italy again, anyway.
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Re: 1905 and 1929

Postby ray miller » Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:50 pm

Nash wrote:
ray miller wrote: I used to carry a copy of Steppenwolf around in my back pocket when I was an impressionable teenager. I read it again a couple of years and just thought how vacuous it was.


You surprise me, Ray! I would have thought a novel about a middle aged curmudgeon would have been right up your alley.


Ouch! But I think the middle aged years have gone now, mate.
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